The PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary

Donkey Tails Blog

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Preston the Alpine Goat

Posted by PrimRose on June 26, 2017 at 6:15 AM Comments comments (0)

This is Preston, he is known as an Alpine Goat as his legs are so long, and apparently his neck also when he wants grass!


Preston came to the sanctuary when he was very young as his mother rejected him at birth, refusing to nurse him. The likely reason is Preston was born as part of triplets, he may have been the weakest or youngest.


Natural selection and survival of the fittest means one of a litter may be rejected to insure survival of the other young and possibly the mother herself. As the picture shows Preston is veryhealthy, happy and growing well at the sanctuary.


Vivian


How to Scratch a Donkey!

Posted by PrimRose on June 23, 2017 at 7:15 AM Comments comments (0)

Donkeys are very friendly sociable animals and like to interact with humans. A great way to be kind to a donkey is to find a favourite place to scratch them. They'll be your friend forever.


This is Earl and the three places he loves to be scratched are the base of the tail, the inside of his ear and on his shoulder just below the brown stripe. Earl's age is unknown but definitely more then 30 years. He has cataracts and glaucoma which is why he is wearing a fly mask.


Vivian


Donkey and Hinny tails

Posted by PrimRose on June 13, 2017 at 6:05 AM Comments comments (0)

An important difference between donkeys and mules/hinnies are their tails. A donkey, as in the first photo, has a shorter tail. This is Jenny she is about 5 years old and was a guard on a sheep farm before coming to the sanctuary. She has become good friends with Evelyn, donkey.


The second photo is Gordon, a hinny, his tail resembles a horse tail: much longer. A hinny has a donkey for a mother and a horse for a father. Gordon is good friends with Wilson who is a mule. Wilson had a donkey for a father and a horse for a mother. Both hinnies and mules are born sterile and can't reproduce.


Vivian


Jenny donkey's tail


Gordon hinny's tail



Oliver, Chester and Robbie donkeys

Posted by PrimRose on June 8, 2017 at 6:35 AM Comments comments (0)

These are 3 of PrimRose Sanctuary's donkeys: Oliver, Chester and Robbie.

All of the animals at the sanctuary are rescued but often people ask why get a donkey. In some countries donkeys are used as beasts of burden, pulling carts and carrying goods such as fire wood and even people.


Donkeys are also used as guards for herds of cattle or sheep. A donkey is good guard against predators as donkeys do not run away, they kick, bray and confront a predator. Donkeys are used as companions for horses as donkeys are calm and loyal.


They are also kept as pets and do best with another donkey. If there isn't one then they bond with other animals such as pigs.


Vivian


Maizie the tortoiseshell cat

Posted by PrimRose on June 5, 2017 at 7:45 AM Comments comments (0)

This is Maizie, she is a tortoiseshell cat. She had her first litter before the age of one year; before coming to the sanctuary. Much too young to be having a litter. Here she has found a safe place to sleep; in a bassinet. There are several theories as to why cats like to sleep in small places, which they can easily do as they have very flexible spines.


Some say cats like to feel secure and, as they are den animals,sleeping in a confined place means they can nap undisturbed and escape unwanted attention. It is also a safe place from predators. Another theory says it is a coping mechanism helping cats deal with stress.


Whatever the reason Maizie looks very comfortable!

Vivian


Marlo rolling in the sand

Posted by PrimRose on June 1, 2017 at 5:55 AM Comments comments (0)

This is Marlo, good friend of OD, also a gelding donkey having a delightful roll in the sand. There are a few thoughts on why donkeys roll in the sand and mud such as: to get the flies off, to provide insulation against heat (as donkeys originated in the deserts of Egypt), solving an itch, and just for fun.


Come and visit the donkeys onThursday and Sunday from 1-4pm and watch the fun! www.primrosedonkeysanctuary.com

Here's the link to the youtube video: https://youtu.be/KaBLCcPyn3Q

O.D. the Other Donkey

Posted by PrimRose on May 29, 2017 at 7:40 AM Comments comments (0)

This is O.D. Which stands for other donkey. He is a gelding and is a small Mammoth donkey. Donkeys come in three sizes with some variation.


Miniature donkeys are 36 inches tall or less. The next size is a standard which can come as a small standard at 36-40 inches tall, standard at 40-48 inches and a large standard is 48-54 inches for jennet (female) and 48-56 inches tall for a jack(male). Mammoth donkeys are 54 inches for a jennet and 56 inches for a jack. O.D. is very gentle and sweet and a great addition to PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary.


Vivian


PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary Tea a Success!

Posted by PrimRose on June 30, 2014 at 7:30 AM Comments comments (0)

The PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary tea was a success! Thanks to the visitors and volunteers for such an amazing event! Lovely weather for the tea, we had some clouds but a wonderful sunny day that wasn't too hot, perfect weather!


Visitors enjoyed sandwiches, tea, coffee, lemonade, pie and treats at PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary tea.



 


The Red Hat Ladies enjoyed their own sitting at the tea



The Happy Medium Corinne Fleming was at the PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary afternoon tea offering tea leaf readings. Part of the proceeds were donated to the sanctuary. Thanks Corinne!




Thanks to Jayden for entertaining us with her beautiful voice at the PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary Afternoon tea!


 

Please join us for our next event PrimRose the donkeys 40th birthday party on Sunday August 24th 1-4pm. 


Come celebrate PrimRose the donkeys 40th birthday party! There will be cupcakes, iced tea and lemonade for visitors. PrimRose will be available for photos and hugs. There will be a special birthday cake for PrimRose - carrot cake with a topping of apple slices.


There is no admission fee but donations are gratefully accepted. We are a registered Canadian charity and rely entirely on donations to support our Sanctuary. Tax deductable receipts are available.



Dine at Boston Pizza Cobourg to raise money for PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary

Posted by PrimRose on June 5, 2014 at 10:15 AM Comments comments (0)

Boston Pizza Team Rewards Fundraiser! When you dine at Boston Pizza Cobourg location, write "PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary" on the back of your receipt, drop your receipt (make sure you write PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary on the back!) in the ballot box at the host stand on your way out.

 

10% of food sales will be donated to PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary! Please tell everyone to dine at Boston Pizza Cobourg and support PrimRose Donkey Sanctuary! Cobourg Boston Pizza is located at 1111 Elgin St W, Cobourg, ON K9A 5H7. The donkeys say "Thanks Boston Pizza Cobourg!"

 

Working Together from The Donkey Sanctuary of Canada

Posted by PrimRose on May 23, 2014 at 6:55 PM Comments comments (0)

We thank Sandra from The Donkey Sanctuary of Canada for the lovely article on our co-operation together. With the two sanctuarys we can make a big difference in the donkey world.

 

WORKING TOGETHER

 

Sheila Burns started the Primrose Donkey Sanctuary 15 years ago in Roseneath, ON. Primrose is not as large as the DSC but Sheila is doing outstanding work on behalf of donkeys. On site, she cares for 40 donkeys and over the years, she has placed 53 donkeys and mules in good homes. At the same time, Sheila maintains contact with these caregivers who sign a contract of care. If ever there is any concern or the family situation changes, then the donkeys come back to Primrose. We admire Sheila’s work very much.

 

 

Several weeks ago, we received a call to the DSC from an elderly gentleman, recently diagnosed with cancer, who could no longer care for his two small Standard donkeys. He asked if they could be taken into lifelong care but, unfortunately, we were at maximum capacity at that time. Subsequently, though, we placed a call to Primrose where they were able to provide assistance. Initially, the donkeys were brought to our Sanctuary Farm where they were given a thorough physical examination, all necessary innoculations and farrier work. Then, after a few weeks when we were certain that their health was good, we moved the donkeys to Primrose Sanctuary. By this time, Sheila had found a good home for the donkeys and so they were moved soon thereafter to their new farm.

 

 

Working together is by far the most positive way to help animals. By combining our resources, the two Sanctuaries were able to ensure continuing, good care for these donkeys and it is of great benefit for each organization to be able to extend its reach in this manner.

 

 

Sandra Pady, Founder

Shared from The Donkey Sanctuary of Canada Blog  http://donkeysanctuaryofcanada.wordpress.com/


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